X-Files

From RISC OS

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (fixed typo)
 
(10 intermediate revisions not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
-
X-Files allows users of RISC OS 3.71 and below to have as many files in a single directory as they wish, which they cannot do without !XFiles.
+
{{Applicationbox|image=xfiles34x29.png|caption=X-Files icon|name=X-Files|maintainer=Andy Armstrong|os=Not 32-bit compatible|desc=X-Files is a [[Long Filename Systems|Long Filename System]] for RISC OS 3.71 and below.|languages=English|url=[http://www.mirror.ac.uk/collections/hensa-micros/local/riscos/filemanager/xfiles.zip Mirror only]|alt=[[raFS]], [[SparkFS]], [[Win95FS]], other image filing systems}}
 +
=== Historical Notes ===
-
X-Files is now very tricky to find but can be downloaded from http://www.mirror.ac.uk/collections/hemsa-micros/local/riscos/filemanager/xfiles.zip
+
Andy Armstrong wrote X-Files in 1996, having apparently seen the 'Directory full' error message (triggered by attempting to save a 78th file into a directory) one time too many.
 +
 
 +
X-Files is now very tricky to find but version 0.57 (which is believed to be the last version) can be downloaded from [http://www.mirror.ac.uk/collections/hensa-micros/local/riscos/filemanager/xfiles.zip www.mirror.ac.uk] or [http://ftp.uni-stuttgart.de/pub/systems/acorn/riscos/util/fileutils/xf.zip ftp.uni-stuttgart.de], including the source code and a data recovery tool in case something goes wrong.
 +
 
 +
RISC OS has had long filename support since the release of RISC OS 4 in 1999, so this utility is only  needed to read ancient data saved on old-format disks (E or F format or earlier) under RISC OS versions 3.71 and earlier.
 +
 
 +
Note that if RISC OS 3.1 is being run under [[VirtualAcorn]], it is not affected by the infamous 77-file-per-directory limit. VirtualAcorn uses HostFS and thus supports long file names and unlimited files per directory.
 +
 
 +
By using an [[Image Filing System]], X-Files has different advantages and disadvantages to programs such as [[LongFiles]] or [[raFS]]. These differences are discussed in this article on [[Long Filename Systems]]
 +
 
 +
When X-Files is not running, an X-File image file is a monolithic object, and individual files within the X-File image cannot be accessed or manipulated. This is quite similar to the behaviour of compressed files within an archive being managed by [[ArcFS]] or [[SparkFS]].

Latest revision as of 00:42, 9 October 2009

X-Files
Icon:
X-Files icon
Maintained by: Andy Armstrong
Description: X-Files is a Long Filename System for RISC OS 3.71 and below.
OS Restrictions: Not 32-bit compatible
Languages: English
Alternatives: raFS, SparkFS, Win95FS, other image filing systems
Website: Mirror only

Historical Notes

Andy Armstrong wrote X-Files in 1996, having apparently seen the 'Directory full' error message (triggered by attempting to save a 78th file into a directory) one time too many.

X-Files is now very tricky to find but version 0.57 (which is believed to be the last version) can be downloaded from www.mirror.ac.uk or ftp.uni-stuttgart.de, including the source code and a data recovery tool in case something goes wrong.

RISC OS has had long filename support since the release of RISC OS 4 in 1999, so this utility is only needed to read ancient data saved on old-format disks (E or F format or earlier) under RISC OS versions 3.71 and earlier.

Note that if RISC OS 3.1 is being run under VirtualAcorn, it is not affected by the infamous 77-file-per-directory limit. VirtualAcorn uses HostFS and thus supports long file names and unlimited files per directory.

By using an Image Filing System, X-Files has different advantages and disadvantages to programs such as LongFiles or raFS. These differences are discussed in this article on Long Filename Systems

When X-Files is not running, an X-File image file is a monolithic object, and individual files within the X-File image cannot be accessed or manipulated. This is quite similar to the behaviour of compressed files within an archive being managed by ArcFS or SparkFS.

Personal tools